Thoughts on Teachers with Piercings and Ink

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Yes I know this is a Doctor, not a teacher….. but point here ^^.

As I blogged earlier, I gave a speech on Wednesday about teachers with tattoos/piercings. My classmates discussed their opinions after I gave some information from research/articles/other blogs. 

Most of their opinions were that it really depends on where the tattoo is, what it is of, and where you are teaching at because some schools are more strict than others. A few told stories about some teachers with tattoos that were a little “much” and others that were fine or Awesome!!

One classmate shared her story that one female teacher (who was hot) had a “tramp stamp.” Some of the girls in her class were upset or jealous that the boys in the class were obsessing about how hot she is. The girls complained to the principal about it frequently and it became a negative tattoo because it added to her appeal for the gentlemen in her class (which is a difficult issue on its own). Yet, in the same school, her math teacher had a shoulder/sleeve tattoo with “darker” images. Everyone in his class thought it was an awesome tattoo, and he had no complaints. 

This is such a difficult issue because it really is situational. Even in the same school. 

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I haven’t seen any teachers like this…. but I want to know other people’s opinions on this kind of look. What does this say to students? Parents? Employers?

It’s a tough line to draw because nothing can be categorized and organized into a neat little column of Ok | Not Ok

Then comes the content of the tattoo as well:

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This would be somewhat easy to cover, but still…..

Do any of you have tattoos/piercings that you worry about when it comes to classroom management or appearance in your school?

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3 thoughts on “Thoughts on Teachers with Piercings and Ink

  1. fbleam says:

    I literally think about this a ton! I don’t have any tattoos at all, but I have been considering getting one that is meaningful to me. It always crosses my mind that I can’t get it where I want it to (on my wrist) because I won’t be able to get a job as a teacher. Why is that? I think in our society today that being different is becoming the norm that you wouldn’t think a tattoo would make a difference but it does…It’s just all interesting to me. Sorry this is a lot of ramble, but I think I really agree with you that it’s all situational. I think the reason some schools might be so strict on it is for the example that you gave. It becomes a distraction and how do you cover it up when it’s permanent? There’s a ton of factors to consider in tattooing..I wonder if I will actually end up getting one! This is an issue I continue to think about. Thanks for sharing!

    ~Fairon

  2. lexyeaggs says:

    I think this is such an interesting topic! I think it all boils down to, are you professional? do you look like you are representing professionalism in the school? there is a difference between person expression (ie tattoos) and actually being counterculture in a bad way (booze breath at 9 am or constantly being disheveled or something). it all kind of depends on where you teach though… when i lived in a super southern state for my first year of college, i had a nose ring and the bottom of my hair was purple and you’d have NO IDEA how many stares i got…people were straight up rude or distrustful..so i think it also has to do with wehre you teach.

  3. tseyffert says:

    I completely agree. I think in our little college town of Fort Collins, we are used to seeing tattoos and piercings. I definitely can see other people judging or being judged based on what/where their tattoo is. One of my teachers was very direct with us on the first day of classes and told us/showed us all of her tattoos and piercings (only the ones in appropriate places). But she was one of the most strict teachers I’ve had and she didn’t lose any respect. She was tough and we didn’t give her any crap because she treated her tattoos as no big deal. So I think it is all about how you present yourself, too.

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